Wednesday, June 2, 2010

The Death of Depth: Less and less of more and more...

Tony Schwartz a contributor at the Huffington Post has a most interesting article today. "The
death of depth: Less and less of more and more."
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/tony-schwartz/self-help-the-death-of-de_b_595720.html

It so speaks to the onslaught of sound and word bytes we in advertising want to flock to for our brands. It becomes just so much oil slick on an already crowded ocean of bad advertising. We always have had bad ads. The vast majority are bad. Now an additional layer of Tweets and YouTube wannagovirals, banners and popups (which are far far more annoying to me than any insert in a magazine), junk emails, and the list goes on and on....of just too much vacuous information that crowds and clamours for a nanosecond of your attention. It is no wonder NONE of this stuff works.

I have to agree with Schwartz there is no real meat in most of the new media. It's like Chinese food, you can stuff yourself and an hour later you are starving. It leaves a bad unsatisfying feeling that there has to be something better, richer, deeper and longer lasting.

He talks of our innate inability to have a long attention span to any one thing. Well it is like anything, if it isn't there, if we have lost the connection to that part of us, we need to retrain, and reintroduce it back into our lives.

Can advertising campaigns reinvent themself into a deeper relationship with a consumer?

Maybe, after all is said and done, after the smoke finally clears from hoping the silver bullet was Tweets, email blasts, virals and all the other short shorts the real answer was right in front of us all the time: and it is that very thing....time....time to grow a brand like a tree: plant the seed, water, sun, protection from the elements, planning on long term growth as the foundation with short term bursts... constant small steps and attention and it will become a fully viable, memorable, valuable product or service entrenched in a consumers mind and buying habits.